Tag Archives: physicians

Change doctors’ minds on OpenNotes in about an hour

My prediction for 2014 is that it’ll be a blockbuster year for OpenNotes – sharing clinical notes with patients online.

For providers who want that level of transparency, yet find physician attitudes can be a roadblock – take heart. We can move the needle and change minds. I observed this during Medicine Grand Rounds at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU).

Tom Yackel, MD, MPH, OHSU’s Chief Medical Information Officer invited me to join him to give a talk on OpenNotes. It was a easy ask; I’m a huge champion of the Veterans Health Administration’s Blue Button offering OpenNotes, now one year and counting. Sharing notes is also an area of my research, particularly from the perspective of patients and caregivers.

Grand Rounds was just before the holidays, so I worried about attendance. Turns out it was well attended. Maybe the topic raised curiosity. We gave out audience response gadgets to poll attendees at the beginning and end of the talk. Early on, we asked people their agreement with the question, “I think sharing progress notes with patients in MyChart is a good idea”. Purposely not displaying results the first time, we asked again after the presentation & discussion. The proportion who agreed sharing notes was a good idea increased from 54% to 80%.

It’s hard to know if the patient experience stories hit home, or maybe people were leaning to support OpenNotes in the first place. Perhaps a crucial moment happened when the discussion focused on provider workload and a physician leader said:

“We’ve been doing this for 10 years at the VA, and I’ve never had any problems from a patient being able to read their notes. We need to get over this and move on.”

Here’s our results — Before and After Grand Rounds:
DMICE Grand rounds 2013

When it comes to OpenNotes, engagement with Patients starts by Engaging with Providers. Yes! We Can!

Link to Grand Rounds video is here.

Here are the slides we presented:

What part of Patient Centered Care do medical guilds not understand?

Update: Two days after the NY Times story, the American Board of OB/Gyn modified their rules allowing members to treat men for STDs and screen for anal cancer. That’s Patient Centered (and member centered)!

I try to stay positive. My dear colleague Ted Eytan says he’s “3/4 full” – I love that. Staying positive in health care can be a hard these days. Here’s an oxymoron for today: Patient-Centered Organized Medicine.

Patient centered they’re not, says the New York Times today, in Gynecologists Run Afoul of Panel When Patient Is Male, a story about Boston’s Dr. Elizabeth Stier. It seems that in her Gynecology practice she sees some men at high risk for anal cancer. She sees the condition to mirror cervical health in women, and she’s become a local expert and valuable resource to her largely low income male patients. But the OB/Gyn board drew a line and said if she treats men, she loses her specialty certification.

A quick look at the OB/Gyn Board website, and I wonder how much they know their members, or know the patients of their members. The Executive Team is all men. Of 15 Board of Directors, 10 are men. I’m not saying gynecologists must be women, but I wonder: how Patient Centered is this specialty organization? How participatory is their decision-making?

I’m reminded of a 2007 paper by Hal Sox, Medical professionalism and the parable of the craft guilds. He wrote about how important it is for medical societies (a contemporary version of craft guilds) need to put patients at a higher level than self-interested and adopt a broader code of professionalism, stating

While meeting the needs of individual patients, physicians are required to provide health care that is based on the wise and cost-effective management of limited clinical resources.

My understanding of Patient Centered is changing, coming to be more about equal footing and a balanced distribution of power. Speeches like the one Anna Quindlen gave at the American Association of Medical Colleges, AAMC, are extraordinary and illuminate rigid, problematic mindsets today. Quindlen, prize-winning author, shared her stories with med school deans and leaders about how health professionals seem to sometimes not know their patients – leading to poor quality and experiences. What is it about Patient Centered Care that medicine doesn’t get? The irony is ridiculous: we’re too busy taking care of patients. Appointments, schedules, electronic records, pagers, phone calls, faxes, secure emails, quality measurement, performance pay, and…and…

Her speech is only available until December 3rd, posted here. (posted about this on the Society of Participatory Medicine blog)

Whether it’s about learning more about individual patients’ values and needs, or the needs of the health professionals who work hard getting to know and care for their patients — it’s where we need to move. About that, I’m Positively 4/4 Full.

“It’s Hosted” — The Walking Gallergy Jacket No. 122 by Regina Holliday

I head to HIMSS 2012 in Las Vegas tomorrow. It will be a landmark convention for me, because I get to wear the latest addition to #TheWalkingGallery — a jacket pained by @ReginaHolliday.

I can’t say enough about Regina and her passion for transformation in healthcare. It’s an honor to join a group committed to participatory medicine, telling stories through art, separately and together.

Regina titled the jacket It’s Hosted, which states ‘Over 50% of Physicians are using Electronic Medical Records’ and ‘I too Prefer EMRs…because Hosting Removes Dangerous Barriers between Me and My Data’. Also included is a picture of e-Patient Dave‘s ‘Gimme My Damn Data’ mug. Yeah!

It’s modeled after cigarette ads from the 1930’s and 1940’s. I have a large collection of these ads, amazed since I was young at how imagery having nothing to do with tobacco has been used for 100 years to successfully sell it. I’ve always thought healthcare could do a lot better if it learned from the masters of marketing.

Thanks, Regina. See you in Las Vegas! I hope we don’t have to walk through too many smoky hotels, restaurants and casinos to tell our stories….